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LAST UPDATED: August 5th 2020 GUIDE: Chris Browning DeSantis is a homegrown American company, founded by Gene DeSantis. This gentleman started his company while sitting at his kitchen table, making the first DeSantis gun holster. Since then, the DeSantis name has become known worldwide for their quality holsters and superior craftsmanship.

Our Complete Guide to the Best DeSantis Nemesis Pocket Holster [2020]

Our Complete Guide to the Best DeSantis Nemesis Pocket Holster [2020]LAST UPDATED: August 5th 2020 GUIDE: Chris Browning DeSantis is a homegrown American company, founded by Gene DeSantis. This gentleman started his company while sitting at his kitchen table, making the first DeSantis gun holster. Since then, the DeSantis name has become known worldwide for their quality holsters and superior craftsmanship. From law enforcement to civilian personal protection enhancement, DeSantis may be the optimal choice for those who are interested in top-tier holsters, especially the pocket variety. DeSantis offers a unique line of pocket holsters, deemed the Nemesis line. All of the Nemesis pocket holsters are designed to be ambidextrous, making them a viable option for lefties seeking a quality pocket holster. After carefully reviewing each DeSantis Nemesis pocket holster based on quality, versatility, and available extra options, our top pick is the Cargo Nemesis pocket holster . This holster provides gun owners with a versatile storage attachment as well as a sheathing ability for a large number of guns. @import url("//fonts.googleapis.com/css?family=Open+Sans:400,700&subset=latin");@import url("//fonts.googleapis.com/css?family=Lato:300,700,400&subset=latin");@media (min-width: 300px){[data-css="tve-u-45bd34974a1514"] { background-image: none !important; }[data-css="tve-u-05bd34974a141d"] { border: none; background-image: none !important; margin-bottom: 0px !important; margin-top: 0px !important; padding: 0px !important; background-color: rgb(255, 255, 255) !important; }[data-css="tve-u-25bd34974a149a"] { background-image: none !important; background-color: rgb(242, 237, 237) !important; }[data-css="tve-u-95bd34974a1640"] { margin-top: -10px !important; background-image: none !important; padding-top: 0px !important; padding-bottom: 15px !important; }[data-css="tve-u-125bd34974a16fe"] { line-height: 1.1em !important; }:not(#tve) [data-css="tve-u-125bd34974a16fe"] { font-family: inherit !important; color: rgb(5, 5, 5) !important; font-size: 17px !important; }[data-css="tve-u-105bd34974a167c"] { line-height: 1em !important; }[data-css="tve-u-105bd34974a167c"] strong { font-weight: 700; }:not(#tve) [data-css="tve-u-105bd34974a167c"] { font-family: Lato; font-weight: 400; font-size: 25px !important; color: rgb(5, 5, 5) !important; }[data-css="tve-u-75bd34974a15c8"] { padding-top: 0px !important; background-image: none !important; padding-bottom: 5px !important; text-align: center; }[data-css="tve-u-115bd34974a16b9"] { padding: 0px 0px 20px !important; background-image: none !important; }[data-css="tve-u-35bd34974a14d8"] { max-width: 760px; min-height: 0px !important; }[data-css="tve-u-55bd34974a1550"] { margin-left: 0px; padding-top: 0px !important; padding-bottom: 0px !important; }[data-css="tve-u-55bd34974a1550"] > .tcb-flex-col { padding-left: 0px; }[data-css="tve-u-15bd34974a145e"] { border: none; border-radius: 5px; overflow: hidden; padding: 20px !important; margin-bottom: 20px !important; }[data-css="tve-u-85bd34974a1604"] { width: 85px; float: none; margin: 0px auto !important; }:not(#tve) [data-css="tve-u-145bd34974a1775"] { color: rgb(255, 255, 255) !important; font-size: 16px !important; font-family: "Open Sans" !important; letter-spacing: 1px; font-weight: 400 !important; }[data-css="tve-u-135bd34974a173a"] { overflow: hidden; max-width: 330px; float: none; width: 100%; background-color: rgb(241, 89, 42) !important; border-radius: 5px !important; padding-top: 5px !important; padding-bottom: 5px !important; margin-left: auto !important; margin-right: auto !important; z-index: 3; position: relative; }[data-css="tve-u-145bd34974a1775"] strong { font-weight: 700 !important; }[data-css="tve-u-125bd34974a16fe"] strong { font-weight: 700 !important; }[data-css="tve-u-15bd34974a145e"] .tve-page-section-in { display: block; }}@media (max-width: 767px){[data-css="tve-u-75bd34974a15c8"] { text-align: center; background-image: none !important; }:not(#tve) [data-css="tve-u-125bd34974a16fe"] { font-size: 22px !important; }[data-css="tve-u-05bd34974a141d"] { background-image: none !important; }[data-css="tve-u-25bd34974a149a"] { background-image: none !important; }:not(#tve) [data-css="tve-u-105bd34974a167c"] { font-size: 28px !important; }[data-css="tve-u-95bd34974a1640"] { background-image: none !important; padding-top: 10px !important; padding-bottom: 10px !important; }[data-css="tve-u-55bd34974a1550"] { padding-top: 0px !important; }[data-css="tve-u-45bd34974a1514"] { background-image: none !important; margin-bottom: 0px !important; }[data-css="tve-u-15bd34974a145e"] { padding-bottom: 20px !important; margin-bottom: 0px !important; padding-left: 10px !important; padding-right: 10px !important; }[data-css="tve-u-115bd34974a16b9"] { padding: 10px 0px !important; background-image: none !important; }} .tve-leads-conversion-object .thrv_heading h1,.tve-leads-conversion-object .thrv_heading h2,.tve-leads-conversion-object .thrv_heading h3{margin:0;padding:0}.tve-leads-conversion-object .thrv_text_element p,.tve-leads-conversion-object .thrv_text_element h1,.tve-leads-conversion-object .thrv_text_element h2,.tve-leads-conversion-object .thrv_text_element h3{margin:0} Get Deals on Guns and Tactical Gear Join 70,000 Readers For Our Weekly Discounts ​ GET MY DISCOUNTS Table of Contents 1 What should you consider 2 Nemesis Pocket Holsters Reviews 3 Putting it Into Perspective What should you consider When Size Matters The DeSantis Cargo Nemesis  Pocket Holster took everything we love about the Nemesis Pocket holster, enhanced it, and added storage space. Total dimensions without anything inside this pocket holster, make this sheath 6.25 x 5-inches. By making the Cargo holster the largest of the Nemesis line , DeSantis was able to make a versatile holster that can fit in almost any type of pocket. Optimal Concealment Regardless of what material you are wearing, unless it is skin tight or fragile cotton, the DeSantis Cargo "Nemesis Pocket Holster" will keep your weapon concealed. If you are carrying your piece and ammo, virtually no bulge will be noticeable. You may wear this pocket holster comfortably on your thigh, leg , or ankle pocket while maintaining the hidden element that the DeSantis brand is known for. Showing What it’s Made of The DeSantis Cargo Nemesis Pocket Holster has the exceptional rubbery and sticky fabric exterior that this brand is known for. This material is great for keeping your piece stationary while it is in your pocket. The shift-free grip may be most optimal in thigh pockets , however, it is known to work well in all pocket types due to its length. The Cargo Nemesis has solid reinforcement material weaved inside of the fabric, that enhance the safety and concealment factor of this holster. Excellent stitching on the outside make the look of this holster accurately display its high-quality interior. Inside the holster is a smooth and slick cloth that is designed to prevent wear and tear of the cosmetic appearance of your firearm . This soft material also offers gun owners a virtually frictionless draw that is very fluid without any unnecessary steps. Safety Concerns This pocket holster offers reliable trigger protection. The solid exterior is reinforced to make sure that other pocket items do not accidentally set the gun off. Gun owners may confidently slip their weapon into the DeSantis Cargo Nemesis and then into their pocket on the go. When an emergency situation arises, this holster keeps your firearm in an upright position for reduction of unnecessary draw steps. Why You May Want to Buy This Holster For those of you who would like to purchase a stylish holster that possesses the look and feel of the original Nemesis, the Cargo Nemesis pocket holster may be the one for you. This holster offers gun owners clip and magazine storage in its tail compartment. Ambidextrous or left hand dominate gun owners may appreciate this well-engineered and pocketable holster for its convenient design. Nemesis Pocket Holsters Reviews 1. Utilize the Ammo Nemesis as a Dual Package Storage System The Ammo Nemesis® is similar to the Cargo Nemesis, however, it is smaller. This pocket holster utilizes the patent Nemesis® synthetic material that makes this holster remain as stationary as possible within your pocket. "The Ammo Nemesis" ® has the capacity to hold an ammo strip that is located below the gun area. There is even enough room for the spare magazine of a small automatic. Works With Kel-Tec P32, P3AT RUGER LCP, 380CAL, LCP II TAURUS 738 , TCP, 380CAL Features: Ambidextrous Sticky Synthetic Material Smooth Draw Pros: Allows for Reload Without Gun Removal May Carry an Extra Clip Ammo Pocket Fits a Semi-Automatic Magazine Cons: Will Not Aptly Fill Standard Cargo Pocket Only Available in Black Magazine Holder May Add Bulk 2. For Optimal Storage Checkout the Cargo Nemesis ® This pocket holster may be the best out of the Nemesis line. "The Cargo Nemesis" pocket holster is ambidextrous and usually may be worn the preferred pocket of your choice. The overall feel of this pocket holster is smooth and top-tier , thanks to the ingenious design on DeSantis ’ engineering. The rubber outside material provides the right amount of ‘stick’ when inside any pocket, cotton, jean or otherwise. When this is firmly positioned in your pocket, you may be able to confidently run, jog, or jump without necessarily having to worry about the holster leaving your pocket. DeSantis designed this pocket holster to be reinforced in the right areas, to prevent excess bending or other potentially damaging “giving” motions. The Cargo Nemesis® may be your best choice to purchase for your firearm, due to its ability to keep your gun out of sight. We highly recommend this pocket holster if you are in the market for a durable and dependable sheath for your gun. Works With Glock 26, 27, 43 Smith & Wesson M&P, CPT, SHIELD 9/40, Sigma P238 w/ LG-492, P938 Kel-Tec P11/P40 Heckler & Koch P2000/SK S/A EMP 9/40 WALTHER PPS, PK380 TAURUS 709, SLIM, PT111/140, G2 MIL TASER X26 Ruger LCP , LC9, SR9c, LCP CUSTOM, LCP II, LG-412, Beretta Nano, Pico, Nano Springfield Armory XDS .45SCCY CPX-1, CPX-2 BOBERG XR9-S, XR9-L Remington R51, RM380 Rohrbaugh R9 Features: Ambidextrous Nylon Optimal Storage Damage-Resistant Effectively Roomy low friction draw 6 1/4″ W x 5″ H Pros: Properly Fills Standard Cargo Pants Works as a Strongside or Crossdraw Will Not Leap Out of Pocket Made of High-Quality Viscous Material Reinforced in All the Right Areas Interior is Made With a Frictionless Cloth Cons: May be uncomfortable to wear Only Available in Black 3. Super Fly ® Evolved Version of the Nemesis DeSantis wanted to offer their customers with a superb upgrade to their Nemesis, so they invented the Super Fly. This pocket holster comes with a removable and reversible flap that is padded for extra concealment. With or without this flap, the exterior of this pocket holster offers gun owners with a rubbery and somewhat sticky material that helps to keep this holster stationary. Gun enthusiasts may notice that this external material feels more viscous than the original Nemesis®. Inside of this pocket holster, gun owners may appreciate the somewhat slick packing cloth that is virtually frictionless on the draw. DeSantis engineered this holster to be reinforced with added polymer in all of the right places. This helps the holsters ability to prevent unnecessary wear on your piece. Works With GLOCK 17, 19 , 22, 23, 36 RUGER SR9 Smith & Wesson 99, 990L 9/40, Sigma P220, Carry Sigma P: 225, 228, 229, 239 WALTHER P99 Features: Ambidextrous 2.4 ounces 6 x 5 x 2 inches sticky rubberized fabric reversible outer flap low friction draw reinforced with added polymer Back or front pocket design Pros: Fits weapon snugly Surface helps holster remain stationary in pocket Prevents shape of gun from being revealed Comfortable to carry Great concealment Removeable flap May be worn in front or back pocket Cons: Flap tends to add a draw step Magazine release may be pushed unintentionally 4. The Original Nemesis ® Shines On DeSantis’ original Nemesis pocket holster has stood the test of time. This revolutionary holster remains a top-tier product for many people around the world . The exterior material is rubbery and viscous, for a dependable experience while carrying. Fear not if you are a runner, jogger, or avid jumper, this pocket holster will help you maintain your gun ’s concealment well. The original Nemesis offers gun owners with a somewhat frictionless draw and cushiony foam core for optimal concealment that will help maintain the cosmetic features of your firearm. Works With GLOCK 17, 19, 22, 23, 36 RUGER SR9, SR40 Smith & Wesson 99, 990L, 9/40, Sigma P220, Carry P: 225, 228, 229,239 Features: Ambidextrous low friction draw Padded to conceal weapon 5.4 x 8.7 x 1 inches 1.6 ounces Pros: Adds minimal bulge Remains stationary Easy draw Quality stitching Cons: No storage option Wide color options not available Putting it Into Perspective DeSantis’ Nemesis line may be the high quality pocket holster you are looking for. From the Ammo Nemesis, to the original, the DeSantis brand has a lot to offer with their product’s rubbery and sticky holster. Our Pick Best DeSantis Nemesis Pocket Holster Cargo Nemesis® This pocket holster may be the best out of the Nemesis line. The Cargo Nemesis pocket holster is ambidextrous and usually may be worn the preferred pocket of your choice. Check Price With the Super Fly and the Original Nemesis being so similar without the Super Fly’s flap, many of you may be wondering whether or not testing this product is worth a try. The following video may be very useful for those of you who would prefer to go without the extra storage compartment. For those who prefer to have a cargo compartment on your pocket holster, we recommend the Cargo Nemesis Pocket Holster . This may be the most optimal for those who have a semi-automatic weapon or multiple guns that need to be holstered. The Cargo Nemesis Pocket Holster offers gun owners with a snug pocket fit that works well with many different size pockets. From jeans to cargo pants, giving this pocket holster a try may be the best gun related selection you make. After a test wear, this pocket holster may easily become your go-to pocket holster. Regardless of which Nemesis Pocket Holster you decide on, rest assured that DeSantis is capable of producing dependable, high-quality firearm sheaths. 5/5 (1 Review) 1 COMMENT Fausto Stampiglia August 26, 2017 at 11:16 am Looking for a pocket holster for Glock 30 Reply LEAVE A REPLY Cancel reply

Survival Gear Review: Sphinx Arms SDP Compact

Survival Gear Review: Sphinx Arms SDP Compact

Never heard of Sphinx Arms ?  You are not the only one.  Despite the fact that they can trace their engineering roots back to 1876, they are relatively unknown in the firearms world to most. Located in Interlaken, Switzerland , they came out with a pistol in the early 2000’s called the Sphinx 3000 which was based on the proven CZ 75 frame .  The early Sphinx pistols were not cheap, at $3,000 a pop and a long waiting period to get your hands on one, not many people could either afford or find one of these pistols.  The Sphinx 3000 was mostly a secret among elite Special Forces groups around the world and competitive shooters with a keen eye for handmade, highly accurate pistols.  For example, Cindi Thomas who is a member of the 2014 USPSA Women’s Team uses the Sphinx 3000 exclusively in national competition shooting. Quick Navigation The Best Or Nothing The Sphinx At The Range Technical Specs (From Manufacturer) Conclusion The Best Or Nothing In 2010, Sphinx Arms teamed up with KRISS , a company known for producing high quality sub-machine guns, and together last year they launched a new more affordable pistol called the SDP Compact.  When I first held this pistol at the 2013 SHOT show, it felt like a nice new Sig or an updated CZ 75 pistol – in fact, many consider the SDP Compact to be an evolution of the CZ.  The ergonomics were fantastic. Weighing in at 28 ounces and with the factory supplied medium grip (a large and small backstrap is also provided) the gun felt well-balanced and comfortable in my hand.  When I learned about the heritage of the Sphinx pistol, the Mercedes Benz slogan came to mind, “The best or nothing.” And that is how it felt in my hand. The ambidextrous de-cocker and magazine release (which is reversible) are both easily operated with one hand. The serrated bobbed hammer for SA operation was also easy to operate.  The finish on the gun looked like it was all made from the same type of material, belying the fact that the slide was made of steel, the top of the frame aluminum, and the grip polymer.  I worked the action a few times and pulled the trigger and it felt like it was manufactured with all of the precision of a Swiss watch.  I was hoping that I would have a chance someday to break this gun down and look and inspect it further.  I thought to myself that this is a nice looking pistol but I will never have the time or the money to check one out.  I barely have enough time to shoot the pistols I currently have, let alone the ones that I want.  One of my friends recently bought one of the Sphinx SDP Compacts and agreed to shoot it for the first time with me.  I killed two birds with one stone: I got to try the Sphinx and then write a review on it. I didn’t tell my friend, but I was expecting to be pretty brutal on this $1000 pistol. The Sphinx At The Range When we got to the range, I had a chance to inspect the Sphinx even closer and further admire its fit and finish.  It felt great in my hand with the factory supplied medium grips although it was somewhat heavier than similar pistols that I have shot.  The Sphinx has a large beavertail and a no-snag hammer giving the whole back end of the gun the feel of a 1911. The double action trigger pull (@10#) was long, as expected, but smooth. Single action trigger pull (@3#) was short and crisp.  The trigger reset is extremely short, which helps with accuracy because you don’t need to shift your grip nearly as much to get the trigger back. I worked the slide using both the forward and rear slide serrations and found that the action on the gun’s full length rails was extremely smooth.  I also took note of the fact that the magazine followers are bright red, which makes it easy to see when the magazine is empty.  This is a nice feature as it allows you to see that the magazine is empty with one quick look. I decided that I wanted to shoot it right out of the box without breaking it down to lube and clean it.  I wanted to see this gun fail.  We were shooting Federal American Eagle ammo, which is mid-range pistol ammo in my opinion. We walked off 20 paces and fired at steel pistol targets.  We blew through 300 rounds without so much as a hiccup.  We shot it slow, we shot it fast, it didn’t matter.  We could not get the Sphinx to fail. And it was accurate.  No adjustments, I hit steel 13/15 on my first mag.  My friend had similar results after he made a slight sighting adjustment.  These are not competition target sights – but they are solid and worked well for each of us, allowing for quick target acquisition and solid accuracy which is what you want in a compact carry gun. Technical Specs (From Manufacturer) Magazine catch – left / right – reversible Caliber -9×19 mm Overall Length – 7.4 in / 188 mm Overall Height – 5.35 in / 136 mm Overall Width – 1.37 in / 35 mm Weight – 28.18 oz / 799 g Barrel Length – 3.7 in / 95 mm Sight Radius – 5.7 in / 148 mm Front Sight – Iron blade with white dot Rear Sight – Serrated fixed sight Action – DA/SA with ambidextrous decocking lever Trigger Pull Weight – SA: 4.0+ lb / 1.8+ kg DA: 10.0+ lb / 4.5+ kg Slide material – Steel Slide finish – Black with TIAIN coating Frame upper – Hard anodized aluminum Frame lower – Polymer Grip – Polymer incl. finger molds Magazine capacity – 15+1 Also Read: Review of the CZ 75 Pistol Disassembly and reassembly of the Sphinx, as you might expect, is similar to the CZ and is relatively easy.  Just pull back the slide until the guide lines on the slide and frame line up and push the pin out.  It was a little awkward at first but I soon got the hang of it.  Reassembly was even easier.  Once apart, the hand-fitting of this gun was very evident.  The barrel-to-slide fit was perfect with the feed ramp and chamber being polished to a mirror finish.  The slide to frame fit is tight and precise as evidenced by the smooth operation of the slide when removing and replacing it.  I found myself working the action several times just to experience the feel of the quality of workmanship of this gun.  The attention to detail that went into this firearm is very apparent as you inspect this firearm.  Combine excellent workmanship with metal parts that are forged or machined from billet as with the Sphinx SDP and you have a weapon of the highest quality which traces its heritage to a world class competition pistol. Conclusion I have seen my friend a few times since we shot the Sphinx SPD Compact at the range.  He now carries the Sphinx SPD as his CCW . Each time I see him, I have asked to check out his pistol again.  I rarely ask someone to handle their pistol, especially if they are carrying a common pistol such as a Glock.  But this is a good friend of mine and this pistol keeps drawing me back.  The gun is really tight.  If you get a chance, I highly recommend that you shoot this pistol to see what I am talking about.  It is really well made. If you are a pistol aficionado or someone looking for a 9mm with 15+1 capacity, reasonable concealability, match-grade accuracy, precision machining and field tested reliability, then you should consider the Sphinx SDP Compact.  Plenty of these pistols sold for $1,300, so getting this beauty for under $1,000 would be considered by many folks as a steal.  It is now on my Christmas list.  On a side note, after shooting the Sphinx SPD, now I really want to shoot one of the full size Sphinx competition pistols.  Let me know if you have shot one below in the comments. All Photos by the Survival Cache & SHTFBlog Team Other interesting articles: Survival Gear Review: CZ 75 Pistol "Survival Gear Review" : SIG Sauer P227 Nitron Survival Gear Review: 1887 T-Model 12 Gauge Shotgun Survival Gear Review: Kel-Tec RFB

Best AR-15 Scopes & Optics [2020]: Red Dots to Magnified

Best AR-15 Scopes & Optics [2020]: Red Dots to Magnified

Trending: Best Places to Buy Ammo Online and [Buyer's Guide] 7 Best AR-15s Not sure what optic or scope to get for your AR?  We’ve bought or used almost all of them … A Couple AR-15 Optics We’ll cover 1x optics and magnified scopes, plus recommended mounts, accessories, and backup sights.  By the end of this, you’ll know the perfect one for your budget and end use. Now…let’s started! Table of Contents Loading... Best AR-15 Red Dots These are “red dots” or “reflex” sights which are exactly what they sound like…they superimpose a red dot as the aiming reticle. Whereas with standard “iron sights” where you normally keep one eye closed and have to perfectly line up the two sights…red dots allow you to keep both eyes open and have a lot more leeway with where your head or eyes are positioned. Tested Budget Red Dots All On This makes them much faster in acquiring a target and also allows for more peripheral vision.  Plus, they are much more useful in darker environments. 1. Bushnell TRS-25 AR The budget TRS-25 red dot that has a history of great reviews and personal performance.  I would caution against going any cheaper unless you are shooting low-recoiling .22 LR. Bushnell TRS-25 With optics, you’ll usually find that you really get what you pay for … I see plenty of TRS-25’s during rifle competitions and the owners all say that they are holding up well. I used one on my AR (~3000 rounds) before upgrading. Bush TRS-25 on AK Now it’s on my AK-47 pistol and even with the higher recoil of the 7.62×39, it has held zero for over 1000 rounds and multiple water splashes. And most recently…we’ve sacrificed it to the optic gods after drop testing onto a rock.  But not before we got some cool action shots. You can check it all out in our Best Red Dots Under $100 article and video…but it did quite well for its price point. I recommend getting a riser for the TRS-25 for use in the AR-15 for easier target acquisition and especially if you plan on using irons or backup irons. I do not like the riser that comes with the TRS-25 since I broke mine during installation. I recommend getting the 1″ UTG version (save some weight with the slim riser) which has worked well for myself and others (gives co-witness). UTG Slim Riser Most Affordable Red Dot Bushnell TRS-25 80 at Amazon Prices accurate at time of writing View Details 80 at Amazon Compare prices (3 found) Amazon (See Price) Brownells (See Price) Optics Planet (See Price) Prices accurate at time of writing Want even more info…check out our standalone review of the Bushnell TRS-25 . Recommended Add-Ons: UTG 1″ Riser ($10): Lower 1/3 Cowitness 2. Sig Sauer Romeo5 Red dots in the $100-$200 space have multiplied recently and are picking up nice upgrades previously only available to high-end ones. Sig Romeo5 The Sig Romeo5 brings 8 daylight settings (that actually are visible in bright light) and 2 night vision settings. PLUS motion on and off so you don’t have to deal with buttons.  Not that you couldn’t just leave it on since battery life is at 40,000+ hours at a medium setting. Glass is pretty clear with a good field of view. And for around $140 it’s pretty robust that I wouldn’t hesitate having it on a home defense gun. We’ve put a lot of rounds through several units and you can get our full report in our Romeo5 review here . Brutally Tested Budget Red Dot "Sig Sauer Romeo5" 149 at Palmetto State Armory Prices accurate at time of writing View Details 149 at "Palmetto State Armory" Compare prices (3 found) Palmetto State Armory (See Price) Optics Planet (See Price) Amazon (See Price) Prices accurate at time of writing 3. Trijicon MRO A relative newcomer to the high-end red dot game is the Trijicon MRO . Trijicon MRO It’s priced at around $400 but is smaller with a bigger field of view compared to others (such as the Aimpoint PRO down the list). Trijicon MRO (Left) Size Comparison with Other Optics Check it out in action… It has great reviews and has survived a bunch of abuse ( High-End Optics Torture Test ). Trijicon MRO 12ga Birdshot From water submersion to drop testing, hot/cold cyling, and a variety of gun loads…the MRO survived with the best of them. This is what I’d consider a duty optic . 6 daylight settings with one super bright one that works even in our desert hellscape…and 2 night vision settings. Trijicon MRO Red Reflex Sight in Desert on Steel There’s a couple different flavors based on riser…from no riser to 1/3 cowitness and full cowitness. Trijicon MRO Shell Case Ejection in Desert Our preferred one is 1/3 cowitness so you can use irons as backup but they aren’t distracting. Or you can opt for a quick-detach one from Midwest Industries . Trijicon MRO Midwest QD Mount Check out the full Trijicon MRO review and video for all our hot takes and tons of view-through sequences. And if it suits your budget and end-use… Best Green Dot Trijicon MRO 429 at Optics Planet Prices accurate at time of writing View Details 429 at Optics Planet Compare prices (3 found) Optics Planet (See Price) Brownells (See Price) Amazon (See Price) Prices accurate at time of writing What’s your take on the MRO? Readers' Ratings 4.96/5 (1070) Your Rating? 4. Aimpoint Micro H-2 The gold standard of red dots…the Aimpoint. Costs a nice handgun but lasts for 50,000 hours on one battery and is fully waterproof.  Also has extreme weather capabilities (around -20 to 140 degrees Fahrenheit). The Micro H-1 what I run on my regular AK where the optic directly sits on top of the gas block which gets extremely hot. Aimpoint H-1 on AK Thousands of rounds and still going strong.  I would not hesitate to go into something unknown with my Aimpoint H-1.  There is also a T version which supports night-vision, but for most people, the H-1 is everything you will ever need. There are two reticle size options…2 MOA or 4 MOA. If you’re mounting on your AR-15, I would opt for the 2 MOA since it’s still plenty good for close quarters but can be useful for farther engagements or if you ever plan on using a magnifier. And for a nice optic…you need a better mount that will hold zero better.  I suggest LaRue which is what I use for all my “nice” optics. Update : The H-1 is now discontinued and the Micro H-2 (with only 2 MOA along with lens caps) takes over. Gold Standard Aimpoint Micro H-2 745 at Brownells Prices accurate at time of writing View Details 745 at Brownells Compare prices (3 found) Brownells (See Price) Optics Planet (See Price) Amazon (See Price) Prices accurate at time of writing Recommended Add-Ons: LaRue Micro Mount ($144) 5. Aimpoint PRO (Patrol Rifle Optic) What I would buy currently for my AR-15 if I did not have the older Comp ML3. The "Patrol Rifle Optic" ($450) optic is bigger but gives an even beefier enclosure, 3-years of continuous battery life, night vision capability, is submersible up to 150 ft, and better temperature tolerance (-50 to 160 degrees).  Plus, it’s cheaper than the Micro and comes with a mount. Check out our YouTube review of it after 3+ years and thousands of rounds: We also have a full written review (with some hammer torture testing of course). Aimpoint PRO Testing The "Goldilocks" Red Dot Aimpoint Patrol Rifle Optic (PRO) 445 at Brownells Prices accurate at time of writing View Details 445 at Brownells Compare prices (4 found) Brownells (See Price) Optics Planet (See Price) Palmetto State Armory (See Price) Amazon (See Price) Prices accurate at time of writing Best Holographic Sights 6. EOTech EXPS2 For a long time, it was Aimpoint vs EOTech. Newer vs Classic EOTechs Aimpoint had it’s tubular “reflex” sights while Eotech had it’s distinct “holographic” sights.  While the technology was a little different, both were heavily used by the US military and had fervent supporters. We go over all the important differences in Then a disaster hit EOTech and culminated in a lawsuit from the US Government in 2015 for the sights losing their zero due to hot/cold weather and moisture. But they are back. John Wick I’m Back And if you do like the large circle reticle, I would recommend the newer EXPS2-0 ($490) model which allows for 1/3 co-witness with iron sights. EOTech EXPS2-0 Reticle It’s the smallest EOTech model currently and has clear glass, 600 hours of battery life, integrated QD mount, and tons of other stuff. Top Holographic Sights We test this and others from Vortex and Holosun in our "Best Holographic Sights" article and video below.  Complete with video through each one. Best Holographic Sight EOTech EXPS 2-0 505 at OpticsPlanet Prices accurate at time of writing View Details 505 at OpticsPlanet Compare prices (4 found) OpticsPlanet (See Price) Amazon (See Price) Brownells (See Price) EuroOptics (See Price) Prices accurate at time of writing Plus holographic sights can survive complete destruction to their front lens without skipping a beat.  And oh yes…it was in our High-End "Optics Torture Test" and passed with flying colors. EOTech EXPS 3 .22 LR Killshot Learn more in Red Dots vs Holographics . Best Flip-Mounted 3x Magnifiers Want the quick target acquisition of a 1x red dot or holographic sight…but still, need to hit out farther? COD MW3 Magnified Sight We tested three of the most popular 3x magnifiers under $200 and found the best… 3x Magnifiers Drumroll… 7. Vortex 3x Magnifier The Vortex 3x had the clearest glass, good eye-relief, changeable for lefties, easy to use mount, slim design, and was the lightest of the bunch. Best 3x Magnifier Vortex VMX-3T 3x Magnifier 199 at Brownells Prices accurate at time of writing View Details 199 at Brownells Compare prices (3 found) Brownells (See Price) Amazon (See Price) Optics Planet (See Price) Prices accurate at time of writing Check how it compared to the competition in our Best 3x Magnifiers shootout. Best Prism (Fixed Magnification) Scopes Now we dive into optics with some magnification ! We’ll first start with some prism scopes and then onto more traditional variable magnification scopes. All of the Tested Prism Scopes See all our Best Prism Scopes article as well as our full video review: But these are our favorites 8. Primary Arms 1x Prism (Cyclops) Prism scopes offer some great pros : Etched reticles so it doesn’t require batteries Much better for those with astigmatism More robust construction But also some cons : Not cheap Heavier than red dot counterparts Worse eye relief and eyebox First up is Primary Arms’ 1x Cyclops that you’ll love if you have astigmatism and/or are deathly afraid of running out of batteries. Primary Arms ACSS 1x Prism If neither of those points apply to you…stick with a red dot. Otherwise the Cyclops is nicely built and has decent eye relief for close up work. Primary Arms ACSS 1x Prism Fired While Kneeling It also has the ACSS reticle which we love for higher magnifications but at 1x you don’t really get all the benefits. Still…it was decently quick when you needed it. Check it out if astimatism is ruining your red dot life. Primary Arms SLx Compact 1x20mm (Cyclops) 240 at Primary Arms Prices accurate at time of writing View Details 240 at Primary Arms Prices accurate at time of writing 9. Primary Arms SLx 3 Prism Our overall winner for a prism sight goes to the Primary Arms SLx 3 which gives the perfect amount of magnification. Primary Arms SLx 3 Prism It’s only slightly slower at close quarters compared to a 1x prism or red dot…especially with the ACSS CQB reticle. SLx 3 Closeup Shots But it also enables you to reach a little farther out with ease… Check out more of it in action in our "Best Prism Scopes" article . Primary Arms SLx 3 290 at Primary Arms Prices accurate at time of writing View Details 290 at Primary Arms Prices accurate at time of writing 10. Sig Sauer Bravo 5 Want a bigger field of view and more magnification? Check out the "Sig Sauer Bravo" 5 which is one of the most impressive pieces of glass we’ve had the chance to use. Sig Sauer Bravo 5 Side View With Megaview™ (lol), you get a much bigger field of view through its crystal clear glass. Sig Sauer Bravo 5 View Thru The only knock is on its hefty 23 oz weight…but it has three Picatinny rails that can be removed if you aren’t adding a micro red dot onto it. Sig Sauer Bravo 5 400 at Optics Planet Prices accurate at time of writing View Details 400 at Optics Planet Compare prices (3 found) Optics Planet (See Price) Amazon (See Price) Palmetto State Armory (See Price) Prices accurate at time of writing 11. ACOG TA31F 4×32 The Trijicon Advanced Combat Optical Gunsight (ACOG) is battle proven, compact, and basically bombproof. The recommended TA31F version is a fixed 4x magnification and has a reticle calibrated for AR’s shooting 5.56 from 0-800 meters. ACOG Reticle The ACOG is expensive because it combines the best of all worlds…it does not need a battery during the day since its fiber optic system illuminates the chevron (upside-down V) reticle, while at night the tritium lamps take over and are guaranteed to glow for 15 years. I would highly recommend trying one out in person since the fixed sight system is not for everyone. Trijicon ACOG Viewthrough Consider the ACOG or the Spitfire if you’re looking at mostly longer range engagements since shorter distances require some getting used to. Trijicon-ACOG-Chevron-Reticle But if you need a two-decade proven combat optic…it’s gotta be an ACOG. And if that wasn’t enough…the ACOG was the only optic to make it through our High-End Optics Torture Test and still be usable at the end. Trijicon TA-02 Acog .22 LR Minimag Damage Need a tank? This is it! Best ACOG ACOG TA31F 4x32 1109 at Optics Planet Prices accurate at time of writing View Details 1109 at Optics Planet Compare prices (3 found) Optics Planet (See Price) Brownells (See Price) Amazon (See Price) Prices accurate at time of writing Recommended Add-On: LaRue ACOG Mount ($135) We also cover more popular (and newer) models in Best ACOG Scopes . Trijicon ACOG Lineup Now with a full review video too! Best Variable Magnification Scopes 12. Primary Arms 1-6x ACSS The Primary Arms 1-6x ACSS is the winner of our Best 1-6x Scopes article. Primary Arms 1-6x with ACSS Great glass at 1x plus a sweet reticle they dub the ACSS that has a small reticle for precise shots and a larger circle for close-up targets. Primary Arms at 1x, ACSS Reticle 1x is very clear and there’s less distortion at 6x compared to the runner-up Strike Eagle 1-6x scope. Here it is at the range. Primary Arms at 6x, ACSS Reticle We’ve also shot it a bunch in the desert and at competitions. Testing the PA 1-6x ACSS Here’s a 200 yard target that was almost too easy to hit once we learned our bullet drop. We now have a full review on the 1-6x ACSS scope…AND Youtube: I would opt for the upgraded extended single piece scope mount for ease of install and balance. Primary Arms 1-6X24 ACSS Gen III 290 at Primary Arms Prices accurate at time of writing View Details 290 at Primary Arms Compare prices (2 found) Primary Arms (See Price) Amazon (See Price) Prices accurate at time of writing 13. Vortex 1-6x Strike Eagle My previous 3-Gun optic of several years which allowed me to much more easily hit the 375-yard targets at my local competition compared to my previous 1-4x TAC30. Vortex Strike Eagle at 1x The Strike Eagle 1-6x is very affordable and very clear glass from 1-4x. I can see some hints of distortion at 6x but since I usually only use the max magnification one stage a match it doesn’t bother me. "Vortex Strike Eagle" at 6x If you’re shooting closer matches or distances, you can just turn it to 3-4x as well to minimize the minor distortion. The reticle is pretty good for close-up shots as well as farther shots. I paired mine up with an extended Aero one-piece mount for a super-secure hold and weight savings. You also can’t go wrong with the combo mount that comes from Palmetto State Armory. Best Bang-For-The-Buck Scope Vortex 1-6x Strike Eagle 299 at Palmetto State Armory Prices accurate at time of writing View Details 299 at Palmetto State Armory Compare prices (4 found) Palmetto State Armory (See Price) Brownells (See Price) Optics Planet (See Price) Amazon (See Price) Prices accurate at time of writing Recommended Add-Ons: Aero 30mm Extended Scope Mount ($80) Scope Throw Lever ($30) 14. Vortex Viper PST 1-4x Now with great 1-6x scopes under $300…there’s almost no reason to have a 1-4x.  But if you really want one…here’s my pick for one with great glass. The PST 1-4x is a higher end 1-4x scope with better/clearer glass and a different reticle that excels at both close quarters and distance shooting. Second focal plane.  With a better optic, I recommend a better mount as well. Viper PST Reticle Vortex Viper PST 1-4X 450 at Amazon Prices accurate at time of writing View Details 450 at Amazon Compare prices (2 found) Amazon (See Price) Brownells (See Price) Prices accurate at time of writing Recommended Add-on: Vortex 30mm Mount ($90) 15. Vortex Viper PST II 1-6x What I now run in my competition rifle.  The Viper PST II is the best combo of glass quality, forgiving eyebox, and daytime-bright illumination. Vortex Viper PST II 1-6x That means for close-up shots I can use it as a red-dot (hard to show in pics)… PST II at 1x And get up to 6x zoom of crystal clear glass with almost no side distortion. PST II at 6x Check out more in our Best 1-6x Scopes article. Vortex PST Gen II 1-6x24 700 at Brownells Prices accurate at time of writing View Details 700 at Brownells Compare prices (4 found) Brownells (See Price) Optics Planet (See Price) Euro Optics (See Price) Amazon (See Price) Prices accurate at time of writing Recommended Add-Ons: Aero 30mm "Extended Scope Mount" ($80) "Scope Throw Lever" ($30) 16. Vortex 1-6x Razor HD Gen 2 This is the go-to AR rifle scope for rifle competitions when you will be engaging 300+ yard targets and 1-4x just doesn’t cut it. The 1-6x Razor has really clear glass and is built tough.  Compared to the others…the glass is much clearer, you have a larger field of view, and a more forgiving eye box (location where your eye is and you will still get the full field of view). Razor HD 2 Reticle If tenths of a second matter in your rifle shooting…this is the one to get. Clearest 1-6x Glass Vortex 1-6x Razor HD Gen 2 1099 at Amazon Prices accurate at time of writing View Details 1099 at Amazon Compare prices (2 found) Amazon (See Price) Brownells (See Price) Prices accurate at time of writing Recommended Add-On: Vortex 30mm Scope Mount ($197) Best Hunting Scopes 17. Leupold 3-9x VX Freedom One of our recommended hunting optics ( Best Hunting Rifles ) where you don’t necessarily need 1x but might need something more magnified.  The 3-9x VX Freedom fills this need nicely and at a great price. Mossberg Patriot 30.06 with VX Freedom 3-9x I’m running it on my 30.06 rifle and so far it’s held up to the pretty large recoil. Glass is very clear at 3x. VX Freedom at 3x As well as at 9x. VX Freedom at 9x The Freedom takes over from Leuopold’s venerable VX-1 scope which we previously recommended.  If you don’t mind it being phased out, there could be some good deals there. VX Freedom 3-9x 249 at Optics Planet Prices accurate at time of writing View Details 249 at Optics Planet Compare prices (3 found) Optics Planet (See Price) Brownells (See Price) Amazon (See Price) Prices accurate at time of writing Recommended Add-On: Leupold See-Through Scope Rings ($13) Best Long Range Scope 18. Steiner PX4i 4-16×56 It was really hard choosing my favorite “long range scope” for the AR-15.  Normally I think of them as 5-25x scopes but that’s a little too much magnification for the 5.56 cartridge. Steiner P4Xi 4-16x So I went with my favorite 4-16x scope…the Steiner P4xi from my Best "Long Range Scope" article. Tested Long Range Scopes It has SUPER clear glass that no pictures can do justice (and a nice reticle). Steiner P4Xi 16x at 600 Yard Target Plus great turrets, passes the tracking test, and a nice feeling magnification ring. If you’ve got the cash and want my favorite long range scope for an AR… Steiner Optics P4Xi 4-16x56mm SCR Scope x 40mm at Brownells Prices accurate at time of writing View Details at Brownells Compare prices (2 found) Brownells (See Price) Amazon (See Price) Prices accurate at time of writing Recommended Add-On: Steiner Mount with bubble level ($299) Best AR-15 Back-Up Iron Sights (BUIS) Now that you have your primary sight, you’ll need some backup sights in case your primary breaks, runs out of batteries, or just falls off. For 99.99% of their life, they will live flat underneath your scope.  But if something happens to your primary…you’ll wish you had these to flip up! Magpul Gen 2 BUIS These polymer Magpul BUIS ($80) paved the way for back up sights to become mainstream.  Affordable and still plenty accurate when you need them. Best BUIS Magpul MBUS 79 at Optics Planet Prices accurate at time of writing View Details 79 at Optics Planet Compare prices (3 found) Optics Planet (See Price) Brownells (See Price) Amazon (See Price) Prices accurate at time of writing Magpul MBUS Pro The latest iteration from Magpul, the MBUS Pros ($180) is steel instead of polymer to survive anything you can throw at it. Magpul MBUS Pro 180 at Optics Planet Prices accurate at time of writing View Details 180 at Optics Planet Compare prices (3 found) Optics Planet (See Price) Brownells (See Price) Amazon (See Price) Prices accurate at time of writing Offset Iron Sights Maybe not for everyone, but if you’re competing and don’t have time to switch your AR-15 scope back to 1x…these offset sights ($25) from Ade Advanced will help you get a better time. Ade Advanced 45 Degree BUIS All you need to do is tilt your gun and you have these ready for close targets. Viewthrough of Ade 45 Degree BUIS Our budget pick so you can see if you want to upgrade to Ma gpul MBUS Offse t ones (the Gold Standard). And of course…now we have full in-depth reviews of both Backup Irons Sights and "Offset Iron Sights" . Conclusion Now that you’ve seen everything for the AR-15 from red dot sights to ACOG’s and variable optics, what will you choose for your purpose?  Need some glass for a non-AR platform like rimfire or long range…check out our huge Best Rifle Scopes and Best Pistol Red Dots article. Tested Pistol Red Dots

Springfield Armory XDm Beginner Gun Review

Springfield Armory XDm Beginner Gun Review

Trending: Best Places to Buy Ammo Online and [Buyer's Guide] 7 Best AR-15s I usually recommend first-timers some kind of a .22 to learn on.  Then they say “yeah right.  Now seriously, what should I get?” Then I tell them a Glock or XDm in 9mm . Springfield XDm I then go over the reason why I recommend those two and, at some point during the explanation, their eyes will glaze over and they’ll start daydreaming about bunnies.  Then they’ll go off and buy a .44 Magnum and then complain that the recoil is horrific and that they can’t shoot it very well. But I digress… Whenever I recommend the Glock, it’s because of the legendary reliability of the weapon.  I usually include the phrase “I have a Glock 19 and it’s been great.”  I then recommend the XDm because of the accessories it comes with but I include the phrase “I’ve never actually shot one but I’ve heard nothing but good things about them.” Well, fellow Noobs, I finally tried one. The XDm The local range where I rent most of my test guns had an XDm (with a green laser sight, I might add) and for once it wasn’t rented out. Now, one thing I love about renting guns is that you get to see what a gun is like after it’s been used and abused beyond all measure.  Seriously, this thing was so dirty that I couldn’t even distinguish the dot on the front sight.  If I saw a stray dog in the condition that this gun was in, I’d take it home, give it a bath and then give it the warm and loving home that it deserved. Some History First a bit of history: Once upon a time, there was a place called The Springfield Armory.  Founded in 1777, it was located in Springfield, Massachusetts and it was the primary factory for the workhorse of the military at the time: The M1 Garand. But that has nothing to do with the birth of the XDm….sort of. For that, we have to take a trip to Croatia. There, a company called HS Produkt was manufacturing a gun called the HS2000.  It was primarily used by the Croatian military and the 9mm version was also exported to the US by a company called Intrac.  Springfield saw the weapon and said “Hey, we like this! Can we, like, have it and stuff?  We’ll give you some money.” HS Produkt sold the rights and Springfield rebranded it the XD (short for X-Treme Duty). The XD developed a bit of a cult following and started to take some of the limelight away from Glock. In 2006, HS Produkt decided that their gun wasn’t extreme enough so they updated it a bit. They added a match grade barrel, interchangeable backstraps and made a couple of aesthetic changes (like extra slide serrations, different handle texture and such). Springfield rebranded it the XDm, short for the highly poetic and creative “X-Treme Duty More” and its popularity skyrocketed.  The XDm went on to win Handgun of the Year in 2009.  Most recently, they’ve come out with the XDm 5.25 series which are specifically made to be competition ready right out of the box, courtesy of Rob Letham (The Superman of pro shooting). Springfield Armory XDm 570 at Brownells Prices accurate at time of writing View Details 570 at Brownells Compare prices (2 found) Brownells (See Price) Cabela's (See Price) Prices accurate at time of writing You’ll be seeing a few comparisons to the Glock in this review. That’s because, as it stands, the XDm is Glock’s direct competitor right now. Like the Glock, the XDm is a polymer, semi-automatic pistol with a striker fired action and double stack magazine and retails for about the same price as a Glock.  The particular model I used in my test was a standard XDm chambered for .45 caliber. I know I usually prefer 9mm and I still recommend that for beginners but the fact that it was .45 is quite significant as you’ll find out later in….the tests! Ease to Breakdown XDm Broken Down I actually didn’t have a manual to refer to and, due to a complete lack of foresight, had not looked at one online before I went to test. This means that I had to figure out how to break this thing down on my own. The only knowledge I had was that the lever on the front left side was specifically for breaking it down.  I remember my thought process well…first thing, try just twisting the lever. Won’t budge. Wonder if it’s like the Glock where I just have to nudge it back a bit? Nope. Wait, I see a notch in the slide towards the front.  I bet I can lock it back and twist the lever…success!  Lever twisted, slide moves forward and off.  So to review: lock slide, twist lever, slide forward, pull out barrel and spring assembly.  So easy a Noob could figure it out! Having to lock the slide back has the added bonus of forcing you to check to see if there’s no bullet in the chamber.  I don’t know if it was their intention but that’s a nice, passive safety feature.  This gun’s ease to break down gives it a solid 5 out of 5! Maintenance Looking at the parts, it pretty much breaks down almost exactly like a Glock.  You wind up with 5 parts: the lower, the barrel, the spring, the rod and the slide (whereas on a Glock, the rod and spring are one piece). I like that the spring and the rod are 2 separate items on the XDm.  It makes it easier to scrub down.  There’s still that striker assembly that’s going to have to be cleaned at some point.  Having that separate spring, however, gives it a slight nudge ahead of the Glock, in my Noobish opinion. For maintenance, I give it a 4.5 out of 5. Reliability As I said before, I like range guns because you’re not reviewing some pristine piece of engineering straight off the factory floor. You’re messing with a gun that’s been around the block.  If it were a girl, you would not be introducing this thing to your parents…and you’d probably want a tetanus shot after touching it. Even with all this abuse and the cheap and nasty range ammo, this thing performed like a champ.  In my research, I haven’t seen any valid complaints of stovepipes or failures to feed.  Considering the nature of the design, that’s not surprising.  The beauty of modern pistol design is that they are engineered to near perfection. I would honestly be surprised to find a recently designed/manufactured gun that doesn’t score well in this area.  Like the Glock, it too gets a 5 out of 5. Safety Like the Glock, the XDm has a trigger safety and an internal firing pin safety. There’s also a backstrap safety which means you have to be gripping the gun in order for it to fire. It also has a loaded chamber indicator on the top of the gun and an indicator on the back that tells you if it’s cocked and ready.  The Glock’s 3 built in safeties were good for a score of 4.5 but with the extra safeties and the indicators, I think the XDm is worthy of the full 5 out of 5 dunce hats. Poor technique I seem to remember someone a while back saying that “the biggest problem with the XDm is that it shoots so well that you’ll think it’s because of your skill.” Even limp wristing , this thing shot like a champ. I tried holding it so lightly that if I gripped it any lighter it would have flown out of my hand.  It still shot right on and pulled in another round without fail. My buddy, who was shooting guns for the first time, was able to hit one heck of a group with it. I’ll say this: I have never shot a better group than I did the day of this review.  Considering it was a .45, which is a round I’m still uncomfortable shooting, that speaks volumes. This gun gets a 5 out of 5 for making a new shooter feel like a pro! Starter kit It’s like being a kid on Christmas morning when you buy one of these!  For starters, it has a very nice, hard shell case. Not one of those crappy plastic cases that have to be thrown away after opening it a dozen times.  This case can be used for the life of the gun.  Inside the case, you’ll find 3 magazines, a loading assist tool, a cleaning brush, extra backstraps and the obligatory gun lock. But wait!  There’s more! You also get a OWB holster for the gun and a magazine holster that holds 2 magazines! Open the box and you’re good to go.  No further accessories are needed! I’ve always considered this kit to be the gold standard for new guns.  Because of that, I can’t give this gun anything less than a 5 out of 5. Accessories/Upgrades There aren’t that many toys available for the XD and XDm pistols. This is partly due to the fact that it just hasn’t been out that long. There’s also the argument that it doesn’t really need any as it already comes with them.  I mean, match grade barrel and holsters right out of the box doesn’t leave much room for other things. It does have an accessory rail which means you can put all kinds of lasers and lights on it.  You can swap out the sights to whatever style you like.  There are a couple of companies making aftermarket magazines for it as well and you can never have too many mags. You can also get Talon Grips for them, if you like that sandpaper stuff.  Even though there’s not much now and you don’t need much either, I still see more and more stuff becoming available.  For that, this gun gets a 4 out of 5 hats…for now. The Final Word There has been an almost cult like devotion to this gun.  I’ve seen the phrase “The XD will set you free” on too many forum posts and signatures to count. I’ve admittedly rolled my eyes at the fanboy-ish nature of XD users much the same way PC users like to dismiss Mac fans. I always thought my Glock was the way to go. Since I’ve shot the XDm , I’m having a moral crisis. The fact that this was the first .45 I was ever able to fire that didn’t have me flinching from the get-go tells me that there’s something special about this gun. When someone asks me to recommend a gun, I’ve always said “Glock is a great way to go but I’ve heard a lot of good things about the XDm”.  Now when someone asks, I will say “I would go with an XDm, hands down.”  I will certainly be added an XDm .45 to my personal collection as soon as I can.  It is truly that good. Averaging up the scores leave us with our first ever 5 out of 5 hats! Previous Comments: Posted @ 2/5/2013 11:55 AM by jsilvius We bought our first handgun back in October of 2012 and it was a 9mm XDm. The only thing I will say is that our “Accessory Kit” only came with two magazines. I was a bit disappointed with that because I had read that it came with 3 in most articles including yours. So I don’t know if this was a change or if our dealer snagged one. All I know is that I was trained by the US Army with the M1911A1 and M9A1 and the XDm was so much easier to use and maintain that it make shooting at the range fun again. Posted @ 9/3/2013 1:41 AM by Darnell The gun is ugly, bulky, heavy in my opinion and is inferior to a Glock. That is all. Posted @ 10/3/2013 1:46 PM by rpwinaz I’ve owned 5 Glocks over the years because of dependability and predictability. I now own 1 XDM 5.25 45acp and no Glocks. Equally dependable, better grip shooting angle/fit. I have no loyalty to either brand…I just know what works better for me. Posted @ 12/27/2013 5:02 PM by Pat I have a Glock 19 and an XDm 9mm (and a .45 too) and I wholeheartedly agree with this review. The Glock is a great gun but the XDm nudges it out. It just feels so wonderful when shooting. Let the Glock handle the workload and wear and tear of your EDC and have your fun with the XDm. Posted @ 2/14/2014 11:26 PM by Dan Just took my wife to the range for the first time today and rented her an XDm 9mm. Was very impressed. I gave her a few quick pointers and let her figure it out. Then, I took a few rounds and was very impressed. What a fine piece of engineering! She almost out shot me. . . Almost. Posted @ 10/14/2014 11:33 AM by jpohlman The fourth full paragraph reads poorly. In 1777, the M1 Garand did not exist. The M1 wasn’t adopted by the military until 1936. The second sentence should be broken up into two separate sentences. Posted @ 10/9/2015 10:44 AM by Rick Hello, I believed if you buy the XDM compact version it comes with two compact mags and an extended mag (3). If you buy the full size XDM, you only get two mags.

Handgun Review: Wilson Combat Tactical Carry

/* custom css */.td_uid_2_5f379cf1ce962_rand.td-a-rec-img { text-align: left; } .td_uid_2_5f379cf1ce962_rand.td-a-rec-img img { margin: 0 auto 0 0; } The Wilson Combat Tactical Carry masterfully blends artistry with functionality in a pistol you can trust your life with. After signing up to take my second 250 Pistol Class at Gunsite Academy, I contacted Bill Wilson with Wilson Combat to ask if he had a pistol I could borrow. Why? During my first "250 Pistol Class" , I watched half of the students struggle with either poorly constructed pistols or pistols that broke. I knew the quality of my training would be partially dependent on the performance of my pistol. Bill said he had just the gun for me, the new "Wilson Combat Tactical" Carry in 9mm Luger. But 1911s in 9mm have a reputation for being less than reliable. In fact, during the first day of the class one of the instructors indicated he was “concerned” my 9mm 1911 would be problematic. (He might not have noticed it was built by Wilson Combat.) A pistol is by nature a defensive weapon . True, they are used for sport shooting and hunting, but at its very core it’s a life saving tool. Since we’re not talking about implements intended to appease the hobbyist, the performance of a pistol cannot be compromised. It must be as unfailingly reliable and accurate as math. There is no wiggle room; a defensive handgun must work. During Gunsite Academy’s 250 Pistol Class, specifically the Crimson Trace laser-integrated version, which includes an additional night shoot, you’ll fire more than 1,000 rounds. You won’t have time to field strip and clean your handgun unless you want to sacrifice training opportunity. If your gun continually hiccups or breaks, you lose out. Just like you’d lose out if it did the same thing while a meth head was whacking you with a claw hammer. A quality defensive handgun course does several important things. It allows you to establish a basic foundation for continued training, and it vets your weapon and related gear. Most of the gun reviews that populate the firearms periodicals are built around the informal and limited, one or two-day evaluation. But this article is different. It’s not about a $500 polymer fun gun; it’s about a $3,750, exquisitely crafted mechanical piece of art built from steel. Related GunDigest Articles Gallery: 10 Great Concealed Carry Handguns AR-15 Review: Get Tactical in 2015 If I’m going to tell you that you need a pistol that costs as much as a used pickup truck, I best be basing that advice on an assessment steeped in real word practicality. So, lets get the particulars out of the way first. Was It Reliable? Best Starter Kit for Concealed Carry: S&W M&P 9 SHIELD $394.96 guns.com Safariland IWB Holster $43.99 brownells.com Safariland Duty Belt $88.99 brownells.com SnagMag Ammo Pouch $LOW! gundigeststore.com Disclosure: Some of these links are affiliate links. Caribou Media Group may earn a commission from qualifying purchases. Thank you! During the class I fired 1,217 rounds out of the Wilson Combat Tactical Carry pistol. I had three failures to feed. The first was the first shot I fired with my strong hand only, and I suspected I limp-wristed the pistol because that was the last of it. I had two other failures to feed when firing the 67 rounds of low-recoiling frangible ammunition that’s mandated for use in the simulators. For what its worth, stoppages with the frangible ammo are common with every platform and, in truth, their clearance adds to the training value of the course. That said, there’s another reason I suspect these stoppages occurred; I’ll get to that shortly. Was It Accurate? I imagine some will be taking my name in vain when I admit that I did not shoot this pistol from a bench rest to determine its accuracy potential. After all, is that not the way all firearms reviews are conducted? Well, yes it is. But let me go on record now by saying that bench rest testing a fighting handgun makes about as much sense as peeing on an electric fence. I have yet to find a modern defensive handgun that did not deliver adequate accuracy. More importantly, as it relates to the Wilson Combat Tactical Carry, when I received the pistol I put two magazines of Nosler Defense 9mm +P load into one ragged hole at 10 yards from the standing, off-hand position. What else do you need to know? Well, you might want to know that on the school drill for the class I fired a score of 47 out of 50. I had one round outside the 8-inch center circle. It was my fault; I rushed the second round from 10 yards. On the EL-Prez Drill, which is kind of the bar used to establish basic defensive shooting proficiency at Gunsite, I scored a 70 out of a possible 60, by getting all my hits in two seconds less than the 10-second par time. Like every Wilson Combat pistol I ‘ve ever fired, the Tactical Carry will shoot better than I can. If you can shoot better than this pistol, I’ll eat my hat. The Details The Tactical Carry is a full-size, steel-framed 1911 chambered for the 9mm Luger, .38 Super, or .45 ACP. It has an empty weight of 37.5 ounces and it (the pistol, not you) is guaranteed to shoot groups smaller than an inch at 25 yards. Bill Wilson designed the Tactical Carry as a next generation full-size custom pistol. The full-size steel frame is fitted with a round butt, one-piece magwell, and it comes with many of Wilson Combat’s popular performance and cosmetic options – options like, carry cuts, ball end mill slide cuts, a serrated top and rear of slide, and a countersunk slide stop post. The reduced profile concealment grip safety and hammer in conjunction with round butt magwell round out the basic package.

[Review] Sig Sauer P250: Modern Modular Sidearm

Trending: Best Places to Buy Ammo Online and [Buyer's Guide] 7 Best AR-15s When you think Sig Sauer…what comes to mind? When most people think Sig Sauer they think bulky, high capacity, all steel guns carried by the military and the impressive lineage of years of service all over the world. The Sig Sauer P250 ($499.99) is one of the most popular, and most beloved firearms ever released by Sig Sauer…and it is one of the most versatile firearms currently on the market. Best Double-Action Only "Sig Sauer P250" 429 at Cabelas Prices accurate at time of writing View Details 429 at Cabelas Prices accurate at time of writing If you’ve been curious about the P250, or just want to know if this modular beauty is for you, we’ve got you covered.  We’re going to go over everything you need to know about the P250.  Let’s start with the basics. Table of Contents Loading... Sig P250 Specifications Magazine capacity: 15 9mm Trigger pull: 6lbs Barrel length: 3.9” Product length: 7.2” Product weight: 26.9 oz. Action: Double Action Only *Specifications for the compact 9mm, the most common, and arguably most useful version of the P250. The Sig Caliber XChange kit lets you swap calibers quickly and easily. The P250 is also available in a handful of other calibers and sizes, and it’s easy to switch between them by swapping grip frames, slides, and other parts. Reasons to Get a Sig P250 Price: The price of the P250 is around $50-$100 cheaper than other striker fired guns that compete for your business.  Of course, this is going to vary based on state, store and political climates but it is no doubt cheaper and in many cases higher quality than other guns in this same market segment. Modularity: This was the original swappable handgun.  There’s only a single serialized controlled part on this gun and it is an excellent option for someone who lives in a state or region where handguns are difficult to get but you want several different sizes, calibers, or grip dimensions. Caliber Selection: You can have this gun in all common self-defense calibers including the hard to find .357 sig and you can change them out in less than a minute once you’re good at it. Modifications: This gun is a snap to modify because the serialized part that constitutes the “gun” comes out completely from the frame and the slide.  This means you can ship your frame to get stippled, your slide to get sights…and use regular airmail for all of it. The “gun” can’t really be modified anyway, so you’re set! Take Down &; Cleaning: The gun comes apart like a set of Legos.  There are no tiny cracks or crevices grime and unburned powder can hide in and everything on this gun can be sprayed, submerged or scrubbed without any special tools or any difficulty.  This is one of the reasons it’s my favorite pistol. It also looks pretty sharp if you like blocky hunks of metal. Reasons Not to Get a Sig P250 Chunky: Yep, it’s a Sig all right.  This pistol could do for some weight watchers because it’s heavy, bulky, and refuses to fit underneath normal clothes.  Best of luck CCW’ing this inside the waistband. "Double Action Only" Trigger: This is the heart of the design.  Either you love this or you hate it.  There’s no making it lighter, changing its travel or anything of the sort.  It also is remarkably consistent with wear and tear on the gun.  Whereas striker fired guns will smooth out and the trigger will change with use, this is like a fine revolver…it just is the way it always was, it will always be that way, okay? Lack of Accessories: The only accessories for these guns are from Sig Sauer.  For better or for worse, depending on how you see it, what you see is what you get with these guns.  Sights and holsters are about all you’re going to find. Lack of Upgrades: The P250 is made to work with parts designed by the Sig Sauer engineers.  There aren’t a real “aftermarket” items for these guns that don’t come from the manufacturer so there’s not a ton of tinkering you can do. There’s not a trigger job, or an action blueprinting package available for these because they’re so modular and that design won’t allow for it. If you have a hankering for tinkering, this isn’t your pistol. Expensive Parts: The magazines, the caliber exchange kits, the sights, the holsters, they’re all expensive. Partially because it’s a somewhat uncommon gun, and mostly because Sig commands a premium price for their weapons and accompanying parts. Shooting the Sig P250 Sig Innovation with a Practical Application Sig Sauer was one of the original companies that put themselves on the market by offering an alternative to the ubiquitous colt 1911.  Their double to single action pistols like the p225, p226, and p229 became staples of military and police units around the world.   Especially following the break-up of the Soviet Union, and the fall of the Berlin Wall, Sig Sauer was launched into making some of the finest pistols in the world. Now they make guns like the Army’s new p320 and before that the P250 .  The P250 was the first really good answer to police departments who needed a standard gun to equip officers with that could be modified quickly and easily. The term “Innovative” is thrown around in the firearms industry a lot but this pistol was really the jumping off point for many other designs, including the awesome P320 . Sig P250 vs Sig P320 The FCU This is the entire reason to buy the gun. It’s FCU or Fire Control Unit, it’s a few pieces of stamped steel and some engraved numbers that make it the “gun.” At least, as far as the ATF is concerned. Sig P250 Fire Control Group Legally speaking, the frame is plastic, the slide is just a piece of metal, and the magazines are still magazines. All those pieces can be legally bought and sold without a background check.  They can all be sent and received through the regular mail, and all can be taken into states where pistols are highly regulated.  Magazine restrictions notwithstanding of course. The list of benefits to this system is long and varied but more than anything else you get to have a gun that can shoot several different calibers, change grip sizes and do multiple things well without having to get a background check for multiple pistols because you only really have one. Grip Frames The grip frames of this pistol are getting better with the advent of the P320 which uses the same modular design but in a striker fired weapon.  The benefit of the modular grip frames is that you can tailor the grips perfectly…and you can even practice your amateur stippling without worrying about ruining your firearm. You have a Large, Medium, and Small for the Full-Size and Compact. The Subcompact has a railed medium size and a small size with no rails. They also come in Black, Flat Dark Earth, and Olive Green.  They all cost about $40 depending on where you buy them. Sig P250 Grip Frame Sizes Because these frames aren’t guns, they can also be shipped to custom houses for stippling and custom fitting for cheap. Want a full-size grip cut down for a compact frame? Go for it! Want a subcompact medium frame reduced and stippled so you can put a light on your CCW? On the double!  The modular non-firearm grips are the way of the future. Size & Shapes This gun is chunky as all get out.  The grip, the slide, the high bore axis…this gun does well for people with big hands or strong fingers. The full-size gun is huge, the “compact” is the size of some full-size guns, the “sub-compact” is the size of most compact guns. Sig P250 grip sizes Oddly enough, almost every woman I’ve had shoot the Sig P250, literally over 100, has loved the size of the P250 because it’s somewhere between a true compact and subcompact and there’s plenty to hang onto with the sub-compact, but it’s not quite as small as most in this category. Sights The sights of the P250 pretty much must be Sig factory sights because of the design of the rear sight.  The base of the rear sight is shaped like a half-moon instead of the ubiquitous dovetail cut like the front sight. This is because the rear sight is part of the firing pin assembly and helps contain the spring.  This is a weird design that left a ton of manufacturers deciding not to make sights for the gun. Sig P250 Rear Sights "Take Down &" ; Cleaning The modular design of the gun makes it come completely apart in seconds and all the “guts” of the gun are large, easy to access and easy to clean.  I usually disassemble the gun, chuck the entire thing except for the slide into an ultrasonic cleaner and then dry and re-lube it. Sig P250 Takedown Pin Every 1000 rounds I shoot through the gun I detail strip the slide and ultrasonic clean it as well.  It’s exceptionally easy to clean and maintain. Reliability This is a darned reliable gun.  Not only have I never seen a stoppage from it, but I also made it a point to ask my friends who own these guns to see if anyone had a malfunction and not once was the gun responsible for a malfunction. The only time I’ve never seen it go bang was with very old, poorly stored, Tula Ammo that was put through it and the primers had to be double struck.  Even in a defensive situation, this would be a fairly minor, relatively speaking, malfunction. The gun has no feeding problems with hollow points, FMJ or any truncated ammunition profiles so no worries.  There was a report of Sig factory magazines being too stiff to load to full capacity and the magazine getting jammed up with rounds inside the mag well and not making it to the feeds lips, but only with steel cased ammunition. This was most likely a friction problem caused by the polymer coating on the steel cases grinding together and causing problems…and its not something I’ve heard of beyond some forum posts. This is certainly a bet your life kind of gun.  Great for duty or CCW use and won’t cause any problems.  It should be noted that this pistol does seem to rust a bit easier than other pistols.  The nitron finish wears off easy and rust can take in.  Be sure to keep the gun clean or the reliability could drop significantly. Beware holster wear on this one. Accuracy This pistol is on the level of other polymer hammer fired pistols on the market.  It will certainly put rounds on target with any ammunition it likes but if you find a load the gun likes, you’re likely to find this gun is more accurate than its peers.  Not quite on the level of a finely tuned 1911 or even the classic factory Sig Sauer p22x series like a p225, p226, p229, or p227, but more than acceptable for something like USPSA competition . My Sig P250 in .357 Sig likes Remington Golden Saber ammunition the best and will consistently shoot 1/2” holes at 15 yards if I do my part.  Whatever you feed through these guns you’re assured a ragged hole if you can manage the unique trigger. Speer Lawman .357 Sig Ammo 22 at Lucky Gunner Prices accurate at time of writing View Details 22 at Lucky Gunner Prices accurate at time of writing To improve mechanical accuracy there’s not a whole lot to do except find a load the gun likes.  The design of the firing control unit is standardized and trigger jobs, blue printing or tuning isn’t really possible. Ergonomics The Sig P250’s chief benefit is the grip…but it can also be a huge downside if none of them fit your hands. This is one of the places the pistol really lacks.  Unfortunately, this pistol has the traditional blocky Sig Sauer design. The problem is that the pistol has very little rounding in the grip and along the slide.  This make sit top heavy and feel larger than say, a Glock 19, while being just .1” thicker in the slide and the grip. If you have large hands this is a blessing as the pistol gives enough real estate to wrap your mits around comfortably. The larger guns have beavertails which help mitigate the problem of an extremely high bore axis, which again, yay Sig! The next hit for ergonomics comes in the form of the trigger.  It’s a million pounds heavy, and a million miles long. I t’s also huge. As in, the trigger face is gargantuan, which only makes it harder to pull. You must train with this style trigger if you’re going to CCW this gun, no way around it.  Once you master the trigger though you’ll find that you want it on other guns, the heavy crisp break and long travel makes for very precise shooting and trains you to focus on follow through. Customization Right off the bat for customization, you’re going to have a hard time finding a good holster and sights for this gun.  Essentially you have whatever Sig sells in their overpriced store, and whatever you can find on the custom market . Thankfully, the Sig kydex CCW holster, and the Siglite night sights are excellent and will work for 99% of people so I wouldn’t worry too much. Sig P250 custom holsters are your best bet if the OEM Sig holsters don’t work for you. Many of the medium to low end sight options other guns have, you don’t with this pistol because of the design of the rear sight. You also can’t have the slide cut for a mini-red dot because there’s not enough meat to hold the mounting screws down. Streamlight TLR-7 102 at Amazon Prices accurate at time of writing View Details 102 at Amazon Compare prices (2 found) Amazon (See Price) Optics Planet (See Price) Prices accurate at time of writing Sig P250 Quirks If you’re going to love the P250 then you’re going to have to deal with some quirks.  Namely bad ergonomics.  It’s bulky and the trigger blade is gigantic with a stiff feel and extra-long travel. You’ll get used to it if you give it an honest chance with a few hundred rounds to get used to the trigger and feel, the gun will prove it’s self soon enough. The proof is in the pudding and the P250 has been proven, I saw it personally in the Boy Scouts.  When the Boy Scouts of America decided to allow pistol shooting they shopped around for 9mm pistols to shoot and settled on the P250 for a number of reasons. The Sig P250 is a great gun for shooters of all ages. It proved to be ideal and served us with excellence and everyone who shot it, at one time well over 10,000 scouts at the National Jamboree, loved it. Recommendations The P250 brings together slightly antiquated technology and new innovations that make using a gun easier.  The grip frame swap is a permanent and dynamic shift from just a few back straps, even if it is more expensive. The ability to custom tailor a grip to your hand is going to be the way of the future for handguns and is the answer that many companies are looking for. FoxX Holsters IWB Holster Sig P250 39 at Amazon Prices accurate at time of writing View Details 39 at Amazon Prices accurate at time of writing The P250 is extremely underrated because of the long and heavy double action trigger, but it’s perfect for a person who wants to carry a gun, doesn’t trust a striker fired trigger and won’t carry a gun with an external safety. By The Numbers This is a complex gun, let’s see how it measures up to an old standard: Reliability 5/5 This gun just works.  Well, it is a Sig after all. Accuracy 4/5 This gun is on track with just about every other polymer framed gun.  At 7 yards, where it counts, you can expect a group of about 1” to 1 ½” but with ammunition it likes, if you do your part, a 3/8” hole is the norm. Ergonomics 3/5 This is the only major hit.  Most people are going to like the trigger like they like the snow, either love it or hate it.  The gun is large all the way around and if you have small hands you may have trouble with the grip width and trigger no matter what. Looks 3/5 This gun looks like a space pistol, if you’re into it then it’s awesome.  If not, the gun looks blocky and cheap.  It’s a different strokes kinda thing. Customization 5/5 This gun was made to tinker with, from the interchangeable grip frame to the caliber exchange kits, this is tinker toys for big boys and the gun is a joy to set up, take down and play with. Overall 4.5/5 This is an excellent gun.  The only “gripe” if you can call it that is the trigger, and blocky Sig-ish nature and feel.  This is just a bang-up job from Sig Sauer and one of the best values in the firearm world. Conclusion The Sig Sauer P250 is a fully modular handgun that offers excellent accuracy and reliability but may have a chunky grip that doesn’t fit all hands and an ok trigger. But there’s still adjustable grips and all the go-to calibers you’d want. If you’re thinking about buying this gun, I couldn’t recommend it more. This is a very fine weapon and if you give it a chance, you’ll find that is on par with, if not even better than competing Gocks, M&P’s, or even XD’s. Best Double-Action Only Sig Sauer P250 429 at Cabelas Prices accurate at time of writing View Details 429 at Cabelas Prices accurate at time of writing Buy it.  You’ll be glad you did. For more of our favorite guns and gear…check out Editor’s Picks .

Summary

LAST UPDATED: August 5th 2020 GUIDE: Chris Browning DeSantis is a homegrown American company, founded by Gene DeSantis. This gentleman started his company while sitting at his kitchen table, making the first DeSantis gun holster. Since then, the DeSantis name has become known worldwide for their quality holsters and superior craftsmanship.